Search Results for 'Pagan'

A Pagan Grace

We give thanks to Mother Nature,
The source of all nourishment.
We give thanks to the people who work hard,
So that food can come to our table.
We give thanks to the plants and the animals
Who die so that we may live.

by Isaac Bonewits

Link: Views from the Cyberhenge

Category: Meal blessings

Tradition: Druidry

· meal blessings · Pagan · Druid · Earth · growing · Isaac Bonewits · Mother Nature

How does my spiritual practice and daily life serve the earth? How does my spiritual practice and daily life affect the poorest third of humanity? How will my spiritual practice and daily life affect the generations to come in the future?

~ Starhawk

Link: Magic of the Ordinary

Category: Quotations

Tradition: Eclectic Pagan

· spirituality · awareness · spiritual practice · people · Reclaiming · Wicca · Pagan · ecology

Her Words: An Anthology of Poetry about the Great Goddess

by Burleigh Muten (ed)

Category: Recommended books

Tradition: Eclectic Pagan

· poetry · book · Goddess · Mother · Pagan

School of the Seasons

Align yourself with the rhythms of the Earth - a collection of ideas and traditions for celebrating the seasonal folk festivals - see the archive page for a listing of everything on the site. 

Link: School of the Seasons

Category: Recommended websites

Tradition: Eclectic Pagan

· Earth · spirituality · Pagan · festivals · folklore

Grounding and centring

Many rituals begin with this simple practice, especially Pagan circles. It comes from the Taoist tradition originally, I think. There are several different versions of it.

Its purpose is to allow you to feel connected to the Earth (grounded), not floating away into fantasy-world, not obsessing about the past or the future, but being present in the now. The centring part of the practice allows you to feel connected to the cosmos and the four sacred directions, which are associated with the elements.

Begin by focusing on your breathing. Don't breathe in any special way, just notice how your breath comes in and out of your nostrils, and how your belly rises and falls.

As you breathe in and out, feel your feet planted firmly on the ground. Relax your hips and your knees and imagine a thread extending from the top of your head to the centre of the sky (this helps to align your spine with the axis of the Earth).

Imagine that your feet are tree roots, and extend your roots deep into the earth. Your roots push down into the earth, through the rich soil, finding their way among rocks, and down deep into the molten core of the Earth. As you breathe out, extend your roots; as you breathe in, draw up energy from deep within the Earth.

As the energy makes its way into your body, draw it up through your legs and feel it gathering and pooling in your solar plexus. Note the colour of the energy.

Now extend a tendril of energy up your spine. Imagine that your spine is the trunk of a tree, and extend your aura at the top of your head, growing branches. Extend your branches up into the sky, beyond the atmosphere, and reach for the energy of the starlight. As you breathe out, extend your branches; as you breathe in, draw the energy down from above. Feel it gathering and pooling in your solar plexus, mingling with the energy from below.

Now draw energy from both above and below at the same time, and let the energies mingle in your solar plexus. As you breathe in, draw in the energy from above and below; as you breathe out, feel it spiralling and swirling.

Now allow the energy to fill your whole body, extending out to your feet, your fingertips, the top of your head. Feel how you are aligned with the cosmic axis.

Now acknowledge the four directions: North for Earth, representing the body, sensation, physicality, and structure; East for Air, representing intellect, thought, inspiration and breath; South for Fire, representing passion, intuition, and spirit; and West for Water, representing emotion, the Moon, dreams, and the blood that flows in your veins.

by Yvonne Aburrow

Link: UK Spirituality blog

Category: Spiritual practices

Tradition: Eclectic Pagan

· Wicca · Pagan · meditation · Taoist · grounding · centring · centering

Oak and Ash and Thorn

by Rudyard Kipling / Coyote Run

Link: YouTube

Category: Videos

Tradition: Eclectic Pagan

· music · song · Pagan

Tread gently on the Earth

by Carolyn Hillyer

Link: YouTube

Category: Videos

Tradition: Eclectic Pagan

· music · song · Pagan · earth-centred spirituality

Hymn to Her

by The Pretenders / Meg Keene

Link: YouTube

Category: Videos

Tradition: Eclectic Pagan

· music · song · Pagan

The Theologies of Immanence wiki

Seeks to explore traditions that embrace or include theologies of immanence include Paganism, pantheism, polytheism, polymorphism, animism, Heathenry, Druidry, Unitarianism, Wicca, and many more. The aim of this wiki is to promote discussion and awareness of theologies of immanence. It is not to impose an orthodoxy on the rich diversity of thinking about immanence, but rather to explore it and make it available to others.

Link: The Theologies of Immanence wiki

Category: Recommended websites

Tradition: Multiple traditions

· theology · thealogy · theoilogy · Paganism · pantheism · polytheism · polymorphism · animism · Heathenry · Druidry · Unitarianism · Wicca

Shared meals

Many religious traditions have shared meals as part of their practice.

Jewish tradition has the Seder or Passover meal, in which specific symbolic foods are eaten, representing different aspects of the Passover story. The youngest person present must ask, "Why is this night more special than all other nights?" and various other symbolic actions are performed, such as leaving the door open for Elijah, and raising a toast to the idea that one's next Seder will take place in Jerusalem.

Christianity has the Eucharist, which commemorates both the Last Supper that Jesus had with his disciples, and also the meal he is said to have shared with them at Emmaus after his Resurrection. The meal consists of bread and wine consumed in a sacred manner. There has been much conflict throughout Christian history about what the Eucharist means, who is allowed to partake of it, and what its effects are. Nevertheless it is a powerful ritual. Stephen Lingwood, a Unitarian minister, suggests that communion represents Jesus' radical hospitality – his willingness to eat with people marginalised by society, such as prostitutes, tax collectors and publicans.

In Wicca, the shared meal is known as cakes and wine, and is usually consecrated by a woman and a man (or a same-sex couple), and then shared among the participants in the ritual. A portion is kept for offering to the deities as a libation.

In some Hindu traditions, a portion of the food is offered to the deities while it is being cooked, and blessed food is known as prasadam.

The ancient Greeks had a ritual of sharing bread, which is where we get our word symposium, which literally means ‘together bread’. In ancient Rome, there were dining clubs devoted to the god Bacchus (god of wine), which presumably had a ritual or spiritual aspect.

Many religious traditions (including Buddhism, Christianity and Paganism) give thanks for their food before eating. Typically, the meal blessing might include thanks to all the beings and processes that went into creating the food, and a wish that everyone in the world might have enough to eat.

Cooking can also be a spiritual practice. It is in many ways akin to alchemy (the transformation of one thing into another); indeed, a cooking vessel invented by a medieval female alchemist – the bain-marie – founds its way from the laboratory to the kitchen. In Jewish tradition, the preparation of food has special rituals associated with it. The magic of a lovingly prepared meal is powerful stuff, restoring both body and mind.

by Yvonne Aburrow

Link: UK Spirituality blog

Category: Spiritual practices

Tradition: Multiple traditions

· alchemy · ancient paganism · Buddhist · Christian · everyday spirituality · Hindu · Judaism · Pagan · shared meals · spiritual practices · Wicca ·

Meditative walking

There are several different types of meditative walking, from various different spiritual traditions.

The theologian St Augustine famously wrote “Solvitur ambulando” (It is solved by walking), by which he presumably meant that as you walk, the problems that were at the forefront of your mind are put on the back burner and there solved. I have experienced this process myself.

Walking is also more environmentally friendly than other means of locomotion.

Eastern Orthodox Christians practice the prayer walk, which is a form of processional walking, with stops for prayers at various intervals.

The practice of walking labyrinths is a very ancient practice dating from pre-Christian times, but also used by Christians in labyrinths such as the famous one at Chartres. In a Chartres-style labyrinth, you never know quite how near or far you are from the centre, so as you twist and turn through the labyrinth, walking slowly and meditatively, you are reminded of the twists and turns of life, and sometimes solutions to problems come to mind as you walk.

Buddhists practice the walking meditation, which is where you walk slowly and mindfully, place one foot in front of the other in a slow and deliberate way, silently reciting a mantra as you walk.

Another way of walking mindfully is to walk in a garden, and walk towards the first thing – perhaps a plant, perhaps a stone, or a leaf on the ground – that attracts your attention, and then really look at it. What colour is it? What is its texture? How is it structured? Is it growing or decaying? Smell it, touch it. Does it make a sound? Follow the patterns on its surface. When you have really observed it with all of your senses, thank it and move on to the next thing that attracts your attention. At the end of your walk, you might like to draw what you have seen, or write a poem (perhaps haiku) about the experience.

by Yvonne Aburrow

Link: UK Spirituality blog

Category: Spiritual practices

Tradition: Multiple traditions

· everyday spirituality · meditation · spiritual practices · walking · ancient paganism · Christian · Buddhist · mindfulness

Starhawk's Tangled Web

Starhawk is one of the most respected voices in modern earth-based spirituality. She is also well-known as a global justice activist and organizer, whose work and writings have inspired many to action. She is the author or coauthor of twelve books, including The Spiral Dance: A Rebirth of the Ancient Religion of the Great Goddess, long considered the essential text for the Neo-Pagan movement, and the now-classic ecotopian novel The Fifth Sacred Thing. Starhawk's newest book is The Empowerment Manual: A Guide for Collaborative Groups.  

by Starhawk

Link: Starhawk's Tangled Web

Category: Recommended websites

Tradition: Other

· Wicca · Reclaiming · Starhawk · Pagan · life · mystery · women's spirituality

Roman Virtues

 A comprehensive list of the virtues cultivated by ancient Romans and by adherents of the reconstructed Roman religion, Religio Romana.

Link: Nova Roma

Category: Recommended websites

Tradition: Religio Romana

· Religio Romana · Pagan · polytheist · reconstructionist · virtue

The Wiccan Rede

 Article discussing the meaning and origins of the Wiccan Rede - the Wiccan version of the Golden Rule.

by B A Robinson

Link: Religious Tolerance.org

Category: Recommended articles

Tradition: Wicca

· Wicca · Pagan · Wiccan Rede · ethics · Golden Rule

The Spiral Dance

by Starhawk

Category: Recommended books

Tradition: Wicca

· Wicca · Reclaiming · Starhawk · Pagan · life · mystery

The Spiral Dance

by The Reclaiming Community of San Francisco

Link: YouTube

Category: Videos

Tradition: Wicca

· Spiral dance · Reclaiming · Starhawk · Doreen Valiente · San Francisco · Pagan